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Seasonality of precipitation interacts with exotic species to alter composition and phenology of a semi-arid grassland

1. While modelling efforts suggest that invasive species will track climate changes, empirical studies
are few. A relevant and largely unaddressed research question is ‘How will the presence of exotic
species interact with precipitation change to alter ecosystem structure and function?’
2. We studied the effects of changes in seasonal timing of precipitation on species composition and
resource availability in a grassland community in Colorado, USA. We examined how seasonal precipitation
patterns affect the abundance of historically present (native) and recently arrived (exotic)

Climatic niche shifts between species’ native and naturalized ranges raise concern for ecological forecasts during invasions and

Climatic niche shifts between species’ native and naturalized ranges raise concern for ecological forecasts during invasions and climate change
Regan Early and Dov F. Sax

ABSTRACT
Aim Correlative models that forecast extinction risk from climate change and
invasion risks following species introductions, depend on the assumption that
species’ current distributions reflect their climate tolerances (‘climatic equilibrium’).
This assumption has rarely been tested with independent distribution data,
and studies that have done so have focused on species that are widespread or weedy

Ashley Keiser

I am a Postdoctoral Fellow associated with the Hofmockel lab. I am an ecologist working at the interface of above- and below-ground communities. My interests include ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, climate change, and invasive species. Through my research program, I examine local, mechanism-driven questions, which have advanced ecological theory regarding microbial community function, and landscape-level biogeochemical inquiries that relate to land management.

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