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Nature is the international weekly journal of science: a magazine style journal that publishes full-length research papers in all disciplines of science, as well as News and Views, reviews, news, features, commentaries, web focuses and more, covering all branches of science and how science impacts upon all aspects of society and life.
Updated: 6 hours 54 min ago

Game-playing software holds lessons for neuroscience

6 hours 54 min ago

Game-playing software holds lessons for neuroscience

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518465a

Author: Elizabeth Gibney

DeepMind computer provides new way to investigate how the brain works.

Categories: Literature

A tale of two dwarf planets

6 hours 54 min ago

A tale of two dwarf planets

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518468a

Author: Alex Witze

Graphical guide to the NASA missions that will provide the first close looks at Ceres and Pluto.

Categories: Literature

Planetary science: The Pluto siblings

6 hours 54 min ago

Planetary science: The Pluto siblings

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518470a

Author: Alexandra Witze

Leslie and Eliot Young have spent their lives studying Pluto. Now they are gearing up for the biggest event of their careers.

Categories: Literature

No strings

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

No strings

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518456a

Details of a climate-change sceptic’s links to the energy industry make worrying reading.

Categories: Literature

A sore thing

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

A sore thing

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518456b

The use of technologies that objectively measure pain must be carefully monitored.

Categories: Literature

Ecology: Competing bluebirds make tougher sons

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Ecology: Competing bluebirds make tougher sons

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518458a

Female western bluebirds that have to compete for nesting sites produce more early-hatching male chicks than do females with fewer competitors. The chicks are also likely to be more aggressive. This has long-term effects on the range and behaviour of subsequent generations.Renée Duckworth and

Categories: Literature

Photonics: Water lens with adjustable focus

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Photonics: Water lens with adjustable focus

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518458b

Researchers have developed a microscopic lens with a focal length that can be controlled in less than a millisecond.Controlling the focus of an optical lens is useful for microscopy and photography, but existing reconfigurable lenses are often bulky or slow to adjust. Romain Quidant

Categories: Literature

Biomaterials: DNA-based gel for printing organs

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Biomaterials: DNA-based gel for printing organs

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518458c

A gel that can be infused with live cells and nutrients makes a promising material for printing three-dimensional tissues such as artificial organs.Dongsheng Liu at Tsinghua University in Beijing, Wenmiao Shu at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, UK, and their team made two water-based inks

Categories: Literature

Volcanology: Sulfur in magma gets a lift

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Volcanology: Sulfur in magma gets a lift

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518458d

Sulfur and metals can hitch a ride on bubbles rising in molten magma. This could explain why some volcanoes spew out more sulfur than expected, and how metal ores can form in the crust nearby.Sulfur-rich magma normally sinks to the bottom of magma chambers.

Categories: Literature

Epidemiology: Plague came to Europe in waves

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Epidemiology: Plague came to Europe in waves

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518459a

The bacterium that causes the plague, which killed millions of Europeans over four centuries from the 1350s, was repeatedly reintroduced from Asia and did not establish itself in European rodents as was thought.Yersinia pestis bacteria live in wild rodents and can infect humans

Categories: Literature

Biochemistry: Sunlight damages DNA in the dark

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Biochemistry: Sunlight damages DNA in the dark

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518459b

Sunlight can cause cancer-related DNA damage hours after light exposure, owing to a skin pigment that was largely thought to be protective.Douglas Brash at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and his team studied how the pigment melanin in mouse skin

Categories: Literature

Cancer: Bacteria protect tumours

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Cancer: Bacteria protect tumours

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518459c

Bacteria hiding out in tumours can shield them from attack by the immune system.The oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum has been linked to premature birth, rheumatoid arthritis and colon cancer. Gilad Bachrach and Ofer Mandelboim at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and their colleagues

Categories: Literature

Plant science: Nectar fends off bee parasites

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Plant science: Nectar fends off bee parasites

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518459d

Floral nectar helps to control parasites in bumblebees.Plants produce molecules called secondary metabolites that are harmful to herbivores but in some cases can also protect animals from parasites. To see whether such metabolites in nectar similarly affect pollinators, Leif Richardson at Dartmouth College in

Categories: Literature

Palaeoecology: Coral growth shut down for millennia

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Palaeoecology: Coral growth shut down for millennia

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518459e

Coral reefs in the eastern Pacific Ocean stopped growing for 2,500 years, probably because of a change in climate four millennia ago.Lauren Toth at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne and her colleagues extracted a 2.68-metre core from a reef in the Gulf

Categories: Literature

Seven days: 20–26 February 2015

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Seven days: 20–26 February 2015

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518460a

The week in science: Head of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change resigns; Europe’s graphene project is on track; new killer virus discovered in United States.

Categories: Literature

Francis Crick Institute raises alarm about train line

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Francis Crick Institute raises alarm about train line

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518464a

Author: Daniel Cressey

London biomedical powerhouse fears that proposed route will disrupt delicate science experiments.

Categories: Literature

Researchers seek definition of head-trauma disorder

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Researchers seek definition of head-trauma disorder

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518466a

Author: Helen Shen

Guidelines should assist in diagnosis of brain disease seen in retired American footballers.

Categories: Literature

Correction

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Correction

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518467a

The print News story ‘Language origin debate rekindled’ (Nature 518, 284–285; 2015) misspelt the name of Paul Heggarty.

Categories: Literature

Neuroscience in court: The painful truth

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Neuroscience in court: The painful truth

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518474a

Author: Sara Reardon

Brain-scanning techniques promise to give an objective measure of whether someone is in pain, but researchers question whether they are reliable enough for the courtroom.

Categories: Literature

Data sharing: Make outbreak research open access

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 01:00

Data sharing: Make outbreak research open access

Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518477a

Authors: Nathan L. Yozwiak, Stephen F. Schaffner & Pardis C. Sabeti

Establish principles for rapid and responsible data sharing in epidemics, urge Nathan L. Yozwiak, Stephen F. Schaffner and Pardis C. Sabeti.

Categories: Literature

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