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Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

Cedar N. Hesse1, Rebecca C. Mueller1, Momchilo Vuyisich1, La Verne Gallegos-Graves1, Cheryl D. Gleasner1, Donald R. Zak2 and Cheryl R. Kuske1*
1Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA
2Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis

Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis
David B Wilson

http://bioenergycenter.org/besc/publications/wilson_microbial.pdf

Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key
step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a
small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose,
probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There
are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different
microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve
cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely

Systems-based approaches to unravel multi-species microbial community functioning

Mini Review
Systems-based approaches to unravel multi-species microbial community functioning
Florence Abram

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2001037014000506#

Abstract

Racheal Erb

I am a Ph.D. student in the Interdepartmental Microbiology program. My research focuses on determining the key microbial organisms involved in C cycling, particularly cellulose degradation. I use a combination of field experiments, to determine the impact of plant/soil interactions on microbial cellulose degradation, and lab incubations with fluorescently labeled cellulose nanocrystals to directly determine the key microbes involved in C cycling.

Email - rnerb@iastate.edu

Schneider 2012 ISME Who is who in litter decomposition?

http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/ismej201211a.pdf
Who is who in litter decomposition?
Metaproteomics reveals major microbial players
and their biogeochemical functions

Leaf-litter decomposition is a central process in carbon cycling; however, our knowledge about the
microbial regulation of this process is still scarce. Metaproteomics allows us to link the abundance
and activity of enzymes during nutrient cycling to their phylogenetic origin based on proteins, the
‘active building blocks’ in the system. Moreover, we employed metaproteomics to investigate the

Bowen 2011 ISME resistance resilience functional redundancy

http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/v5/n9/pdf/ismej201122a.pdf

The ISME Journal (2011) 5, 1540–1548
Microbial community composition in sediments resists perturbation by nutrient enrichment
Jennifer L Bowen et al.

Functional redundancy in bacterial communities is expected to allow microbial assemblages to
survive perturbation by allowing continuity in function despite compositional changes in
communities. Recent evidence suggests, however, that microbial communities change both
composition and function as a result of disturbance. We present evidence for a third response:

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