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Faith and science can find common ground

Nature - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 00:00

Faith and science can find common ground

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/523503a

Author: David M. Lodge

Pope Francis has found a meeting place for those with extreme religious and environmentalist stances, says David M. Lodge.

Categories: Literature

NASA launches mission to Greenland

Nature - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 00:00

NASA launches mission to Greenland

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/523510a

Author: Jeff Tollefson

Ship and planes will probe water–ice interface in fjords.

Categories: Literature

Budget showdown leaves US science agencies in limbo

Nature - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 00:00

Budget showdown leaves US science agencies in limbo

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/523513a

Author: Chris Cesare

Lawmakers face looming deadline to reach a deal — or risk government shutdown.

Categories: Literature

Hospital checklists are meant to save lives — so why do they often fail?

Nature - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 00:00

Hospital checklists are meant to save lives — so why do they often fail?

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/523516a

Author: Emily Anthes

An easy method that promised to cut complications in surgery may not be so simple after all.

Categories: Literature

History: From blackboards to bombs

Nature - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 00:00

History: From blackboards to bombs

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/523523a

Author: David Kaiser

Seventy years after the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by nuclear weapons, David Kaiser investigates the legacy of 'the physicists' war'.

Categories: Literature

President Obama Announces Major New Limits on Interstate Ivory Trade

Yale Environment 360 - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 10:46

President Obama has announced strict new limits aimed at stemming the global ivory trade which, when implemented,

FWS crushed illegal ivory trinkets in Times Square. would nearly ban all ivory trade within the United States. The measures also include new restrictions on when ivory can be exported to other countries. “We’re proposing a new rule that bans the sale of virtually all ivory across state lines,” Obama said at a press conference in Kenya on Saturday. Current laws in the U.S. are aimed at controlling the import and export of ivory, while allowing some legal trade among states — a loophole that many illegal ivory dealers have used to their advantage. The new regulation, expected to be finalized later this year, would restrict ivory trade between states to items that are over 100 years old or contain only very small amounts of ivory. The U.S. is estimated to be the world's second largest ivory market, with sales outpacing all nations except China.

Categories: Environmental News

Why the Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement May Ultimately Win

Yale Environment 360 - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 07:28

The fossil fuel divestment campaign has so far persuaded only a handful of universities and investment funds to change their policies. But if the movement can help shift public opinion about climate change, its organizers say, it will have achieved its primary goal. BY MARC GUNTHER

Categories: Environmental News

European Union Is Increasingly Turning to Wind Power, Report Shows

Yale Environment 360 - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 10:55

The European Union met 8 percent of its electricity demand with wind power last year, up from roughly 7 percent in 2012,

Wind farm off the coast of the Netherlands according to a report by the Joint Research Center, the European Commission's in-house science service. That's equal to the combined total electricity consumption of Belgium, Ireland, Greece, and the Netherlands, the report notes, and it is a heartening sign for the E.U. wind power sector, which had seen turbine installations decline in 2013. Denmark generated enough wind power to meet 40 percent of its electricity demand, and in Ireland, Portugal, and Spain, wind's share made up between 19 and 25 percent of final consumption. Fifteen other E.U. nations generated 4 percent or more of their electricity from wind. By 2020, wind energy will provide at least 12 percent of Europe's electricity, the analysis says. Globally, wind power has grown dramatically over the last two decades, soaring from 3.5 gigawatts in 1994 to roughly 370 gigawatts by the end of 2014.

Categories: Environmental News

Scientist criticizes media portrayal of research

Nature - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 00:00

Scientist criticizes media portrayal of research

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/523505f

Author: Chris Woolston

A psychology researcher looks at media missteps in reporting work on music and the brain.

Categories: Literature

Synthetic Coral Could Remove Mercury Pollution From Ocean, Researchers Say

Yale Environment 360 - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 10:47

Chinese researchers have constructed a type of synthetic coral that could help remove toxic heavy metals like mercury from

Microscope image of the coral-like structure the ocean, according to a report in the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. Mercury can be especially toxic to corals because they very efficiently adsorb heavy metals, the scientists note. They took advantage of that ability to create a synthetic coral that can bind and remove mercury pollution in water. The coral-like structure is covered with self-curling nanoplates made of aluminum oxide — a chemical compound that can collect heavy metals. The scientists found that the synthetic coral structure could bind mercury 2.5 times more efficiently than aluminum oxide particles alone. According to the World Health Organization, up to 17 in every thousand children living in areas relying on subsistence fishing showed cognitive declines caused by eating mercury-contaminated fish.

Categories: Environmental News

With Camera Drones, New Tool For Viewing and Saving Nature

Yale Environment 360 - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 07:36



In a career spanning four decades, award-winning filmmaker Thomas Lennon has tackled topics as diverse as the Irish in America and a polluting chemical plant in China. But it was his current project — a short film about the Delaware River — that opened his eyes to what he sees as a revolutionary new tool for viewing the natural world: the camera drone. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Lennon — who produced a video of drone images from the Delaware for e360 — describes how drones are a major innovation that allows filmmakers to capture images from vantage points never before possible. “There’s an opportunity for visual excitement, but combined — and this is the key — with intimacy,” Lennon says. “And I think that can become a tool for artists as well as for environmentalists.”
Watch video | Read interview

Categories: Environmental News

NASA spies Earth-sized exoplanet orbiting Sun-like star

Nature - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 00:00

NASA spies Earth-sized exoplanet orbiting Sun-like star

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature.2015.18048

Author: Alexandra Witze

Potentially rocky world spotted by Kepler spacecraft offers glimpse at Earth's future.

Categories: Literature

Algae Could Be an Environmentally Friendly Livestock Feed, Study Finds

Yale Environment 360 - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 11:20

Algae could replace corn as feed for cattle and other livestock, according to findings published in the Journal of Animal Science. Algae — hardy

Algae-based cattle feed microorganisms that can grow in a variety of environments and laboratory settings — require less fertilizer, water, land, and herbicides than corn, and thus could prove to be an environmentally friendly alternative for livestock feed, researchers say. The materials used in the new study were remnants of algae grown and processed for other applications, such as cosmetics, cooking oil, and biofuels, and would otherwise have been burned as waste. The researchers found that even these pre-processed leftovers were able to provide the same amount of protein as corn, along with slightly more fat. Cattle in the study readily ate the algae at a variety of concentrations and maintained their body weight as well as corn-fed cattle. Researchers say the algal meal could be priced to compete with corn and could be on the market by 2016.

Categories: Environmental News

Antibody drugs for Alzheimer’s show glimmers of promise

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Antibody drugs for Alzheimer’s show glimmers of promise

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature.2015.18031

Author: Sara Reardon

After a string of failed trials, drugs that target protein build-up in the brain appear to slow disease progress.

Categories: Literature

Sustainability: Bypassing the methane cycle

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Sustainability: Bypassing the methane cycle

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14633

Authors: Paul L. E. Bodelier

A genetically modified rice with more starch in its grains also provides fewer nutrients for methane-producing soil microbes. This dual benefit might help to meet the urgent need for globally sustainable food production. See Letter p.602

Categories: Literature

Structural biology: Arresting developments in receptor signalling

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Structural biology: Arresting developments in receptor signalling

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14637

Authors: Jeffrey L. Benovic

The first crystal structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor in complex with an arrestin protein provides insight into how the signalling pathways activated by these receptors are switched off through desensitization. See Article p.561

Categories: Literature

Ophthalmology: Cataracts dissolved

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Ophthalmology: Cataracts dissolved

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14629

Authors: J. Fielding Hejtmancik

Mutations underlying hereditary cataracts in two families impair the function of an enzyme that synthesizes the lens molecule lanosterol. The finding may lead to non-surgical prevention and treatment of cataracts. See Letter p.607

Categories: Literature

Metabolic co-dependence gives rise to collective oscillations within biofilms

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Metabolic co-dependence gives rise to collective oscillations within biofilms

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14660

Authors: Jintao Liu, Arthur Prindle, Jacqueline Humphries, Marçal Gabalda-Sagarra, Munehiro Asally, Dong-yeon D. Lee, San Ly, Jordi Garcia-Ojalvo & Gürol M. Süel

Cells that reside within a community can cooperate and also compete with each other for resources. It remains unclear how these opposing interactions are resolved at the population level. Here we investigate such an internal conflict within a microbial (Bacillus subtilis) biofilm community:

Categories: Literature

Biogenesis and structure of a type VI secretion membrane core complex

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Biogenesis and structure of a type VI secretion membrane core complex

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14667

Authors: Eric Durand, Van Son Nguyen, Abdelrahim Zoued, Laureen Logger, Gérard Péhau-Arnaudet, Marie-Stéphanie Aschtgen, Silvia Spinelli, Aline Desmyter, Benjamin Bardiaux, Annick Dujeancourt, Alain Roussel, Christian Cambillau, Eric Cascales & Rémi Fronzes

Bacteria share their ecological niches with other microbes. The bacterial type VI secretion system is one of the key players in microbial competition, as well as being an important virulence determinant during bacterial infections. It assembles a nano-crossbow-like structure in the cytoplasm of the attacker

Categories: Literature

Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

Nature - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 00:00

Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

Nature 523, 7562 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14656

Authors: Yanyong Kang, X. Edward Zhou, Xiang Gao, Yuanzheng He, Wei Liu, Andrii Ishchenko, Anton Barty, Thomas A. White, Oleksandr Yefanov, Gye Won Han, Qingping Xu, Parker W. de Waal, Jiyuan Ke, M. H. Eileen Tan, Chenghai Zhang, Arne Moeller, Graham M. West, Bruce D. Pascal, Ned Van Eps, Lydia N. Caro, Sergey A. Vishnivetskiy, Regina J. Lee, Kelly M. Suino-Powell, Xin Gu, Kuntal Pal, Jinming Ma, Xiaoyong Zhi, Sébastien Boutet, Garth J. Williams, Marc Messerschmidt, Cornelius Gati, Nadia A. Zatsepin, Dingjie Wang, Daniel James, Shibom Basu, Shatabdi Roy-Chowdhury, Chelsie E. Conrad, Jesse Coe, Haiguang Liu, Stella Lisova, Christopher Kupitz, Ingo Grotjohann, Raimund Fromme, Yi Jiang, Minjia Tan, Huaiyu Yang, Jun Li, Meitian Wang, Zhong Zheng, Dianfan Li, Nicole Howe, Yingming Zhao, Jörg Standfuss, Kay Diederichs, Yuhui Dong, Clinton S. Potter, Bridget Carragher, Martin Caffrey, Hualiang Jiang, Henry N. Chapman, John C. H. Spence, Petra Fromme, Uwe Weierstall, Oliver P. Ernst, Vsevolod Katritch, Vsevolod V. Gurevich, Patrick R. Griffin, Wayne L. Hubbell, Raymond C. Stevens, Vadim Cherezov, Karsten Melcher & H. Eric Xu

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of

Categories: Literature

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